Entries tagged with “rainbow trout”.


After brunch on Sunday (Mother’s Day), Paul and I hitched the boat trailer to my truck and slipped over to Beauvais Lake for a few hours. The girls stayed behind to visit. Paul’s vacation was drawing to a close and he wanted to try and catch a brown trout, his first one, before heading back to Winnipeg on Tuesday (today).

Beauvais Lake

Beauvais Lake, Alberta. It was a gorgeous afternoon - no wind and the lake was calm as glass!

 We were surprised to see there were only a couple other boats on the lake. Kelly and Cathy were in one of them and it looked like they were having a good time catching fish. Later, they sent me a great photo of a moose they encountered while fishing that day.

A close encounter with a Beauvais Lake moose! Photo courtesy of Kelly Thomas.

A close encounter with a Beauvais Lake moose! Photo courtesy of Kelly Thomas.

 Paul and I caught a half dozen rainbows (small ones) near the boat launch, and I also landed a 12-inch brown. We worked the shoreline along the cabins, catching more rainbows, but nothing larger than about 14 inches.

Paul lands a rainbow trout

Landing a Beauvais Lake rainbow trout

We rowed toward Scott’s Point, where Paul latched onto a nice Beauvais Lake longnose sucker, using a Bead-head Prince Nymph. The BH Prince has become Paul’s, “Go-to fly.” He laughed when I told him he had just caught a Manitoba brown trout.  He wasn’t fooled. A few minutes later, though, Paul hooked his first real, bona fide Alberta brown trout, and a dandy, at that! It had to be 20 inches, at least. I grabbed my camera and started to snap some pictures of Paul leading the monster brown toward the net. Just then, the trout thrashed on the surface (see photo below), causing the fly, you guessed it – a BH Prince, to become dislodged. Paul’s line went slack – the brown trout was gone. We were both disappointed, but at least had photos of the action, and more importantly, proof that Paul had hooked his first-ever brown!

The one that got away!

The one that got away!

 It was time to get serious, so I switched to a #6 Olive Woolly Bugger. Those browns were in trouble now! After only a few casts, I had a solid hit. “It’s got to be a brown trout, for sure,” I thought. Alas, it was only another Manitoba brown trout (a.k.a. Beauvais Lake longnose sucker). That’s right, another sucker! Paul and I laughed … again, and kept on fishing. Soon after, I got another strike on my Woolly Bugger; this time it was a brown, measuring about 14 inches. We fished until 5:30, then headed back to town to pick up the girls for a 7:00 dinner reservation. Time sure flies when you’re having fun, even if you’re catching suckers!

A face only a mother could love. It was Mother's Day, after all!

A face only a mother could love. It was Mother's Day, after all!

 

Beauvais Lake brown trout
Beauvais Lake brown trout

Paul wanted to fish one last time before heading home so we went over to Summit Lake yesterday. The weather didn’t co-operate, though, like it did the day before. It was cool, drizzly and a strong easterly wind blew the entire time we were there. Despite these conditions, we had a good time. We managed to land a few of the larger rainbows and also caught some nice cutthroat trout. Some of the larger cutts were really colorful. All in all, it was a good way for Paul to end his Crowsnest Pass vacation. He’s already planning next year’s trip!

Note: To all my friends in Manitoba, the reference to Manitoba brown trout – longnose suckers was made in jest. No offence intended. Please, no angry emails. It was only a joke :)  

Summit Lake, BC

Paul with a nice Summit Lake cuttie

On our way home from a trip to Lethbridge on Sunday, my brother-in-law, Paul, and I made a quick detour past Lee Lake to check whether it was ice-free yet. We discovered that except for a couple of small bays, the lake was completely open, thanks to the hurricane-force winds that had been blowing in Crowsnest Pass most of the day. We returned to the lake yesterday morning at about 10:30 and fished until 4:00 pm. The wind wasn’t quite a bad as the day before and we were able to deal with it, without too much difficulty. The nice thing about Lee Lake is you can always find a spot that’s sheltered, regardless of how hard it’s blowing, or its direction.

Within minutes of arriving, we had launched the raft and we’re fishing. Paul hooked into the first fish on his second or third cast. Paul’s visiting from Winnipeg and although he’s more experienced fishing for walleye on his home waters using spinning gear, he’s really taken to fly-fishing for trout in recent years and can hold his own with a fly rod.

How was the fishing? Quite good … actually. We were into fish from the get-go and it was pretty much non-stop action the entire day. Lots of rainbows in the 10 to 12-inch range, and a surprising number of fish in the 14 to 16-inch class. The only fly we used all day were Bead-head Prince nymphs, and we fished them under a strike indicator. One of my flies became so torn apart by fish that the only material left on it was the bead and a bit of thread holding the white goose biot wings to the hook shank. The trout didn’t care, though, and they kept eating it anyway! We only saw two or three bank anglers and one other boat the whole time we were out. More Canada geese have arrived at the lake and we also saw a bald eagle, loons and quite a few mallards. Here’s a couple of photos of the day.

Paul landing a rainbow trout

Paul landing a rainbow trout

Flying fish?

Flying fish?

There’s a saying in Crowsnest Pass, “If you don’t like the weather, wait a minute.” Most residents of the Pass know this to be true, and know the weather most definitely can (and often does) change around here by the minute. I experienced this first-hand a few days ago, while fishing the Crowsnest River. Prior to the weekend, Terry had invited me to join him on the Crow on Easter Monday. He had already been out several times this spring, but it would be my first trip of the season. After a fishless winter, I was chomping at the bit.

 There were strong winds in the forecast, nothing new for Crowsnest Pass, so we decided to fish a section that was sheltered and would hopefully provide a bit of protection from the elements. We arrived at the river shortly before noon. It was quite pleasant, the sun was shining and it was warm outside. Best of all, the wind hadn’t picked up … yet.

Terry set up a double-nymph rig, using a golden stonefly pattern and a chironimid imitation as the dropper. The river had just a bit of color to it, so I chose a Wire San Juan Worm. This pattern works well on the Crow almost all the time, but it seems to be especially productive when the river is a little off color, or clouded, as it was today. We fished a couple of bends in the river, landing one rainbow trout, then decided to break for lunch. It was a good thing we did. Just as we were finishing our sandwiches the wind started to pick up. Something was blowing in from the west … snowflakes, actually.

Lunchroom with a view

Lunchroom with a view

We continued downstream toward a couple of fishy-looking runs, where Terry landed a nice sixteen-inch rainbow. The trout had taken his chironimid (midge) pattern. I managed to snap a few photos, before Terry released the colorful trout.

Terry netting a nice rainbow trout

Terry netting a nice rainbow trout

By now the wind was blowing hard, and sometimes you had to wait and cast between gusts. At times the wind seemed to settle down a little, allowing your fly to land almost where you wanted it.

One of the colorful rainbows I managed to catch after lunch

One of the colorful rainbows I managed to catch after lunch

We caught a few more fish, then decided to head back upstream and try some of the spots we fished earlier. That’s when things really changed … the weather, that is. Clouds rolled in and the sun disappeared. The temperature dropped significantly, and the wind picked up even more. To top it off, it started to snow … almost blizzard-like.

It started to snow ...go figure!

It started to snow ... go figure!

 Then, as quickly as it started, the sky cleared. This went on for the next couple hours. It was like a roller coaster – sunny, cloudy, snowy, windy, calm, cold, warm … !  In the meantime, we kept on fishing and catching the odd trout. It was great!

The sun comes out ... again!

The sun comes out ... again!

Terry, with the last trout of the day! It was time to head home :(

Terry, with the last trout of the day! It was time to head home :(